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The elixir of youth, comes from your own blood

Research from the US shows that mice who received human blood plasma from teenagers enjoyed better memory, faster speed and improved brain function.

But it seems its effects could be reversed thanks to the blood plasma of teenagers, which may form the basis for youth-restoring treatment in the elderly.

Young blood: The plasma in young people is said to hold the key to reversing ageing in the brain

The claim, made by California-based research company Alkahest, suggests that proteins in adolescent blood can actually rebuild damaged cells and u-turn age-related deterioration. teen

Using donations from 18 year-olds, the researchers gave middle-aged mice two doses of human blood each week and monitored the reactions.

Prior to the treatment, the mice aged as standard - showing reduced speed and diminished memory.

But, following three weeks of the transfusions, that all changed - with the rodents developing new brain cells and exhibiting greater speed, agility and reaction times.

The study's author, Sakura Minami, said that her team had seen a “rejuvenation effect” on the mice – something which held promise for a possible human treatment, particularly for those suffering from Alzheimer's disease.

“Young human plasma improves cognition,” Minami, told the Society for Neuroscience during their annual meeting in San Diego on Monday, New Scientist note.

THE ELIXIR OF YOUTH Plasma from the blood of young people ‘REVERSES the ageing process’

Research from the US shows that mice who received human blood plasma from teenagers enjoyed better memory, faster speed and improved brain function.

But it seems its effects could be reversed thanks to the blood plasma of teenagers, which may form the basis for youth-restoring treatment in the elderly.

Young blood: The plasma in young people is said to hold the key to reversing ageing in the brain

The claim, made by California-based research company Alkahest, suggests that proteins in adolescent blood can actually rebuild damaged cells and u-turn age-related deterioration.

Using donations from 18 year-olds, the researchers gave middle-aged mice two doses of human blood each week and monitored the reactions.blood plasma sample

Prior to the treatment, the mice aged as standard - showing reduced speed and diminished memory.

But, following three weeks of the transfusions, that all changed - with the rodents developing new brain cells and exhibiting greater speed, agility and reaction times.

The study's author, Sakura Minami, said that her team had seen a “rejuvenation effect” on the mice – something which held promise for a possible human treatment, particularly for those suffering from Alzheimer's disease.

“Young human plasma improves cognition,” Minami, told the Society for Neuroscience during their annual meeting in San Diego on Monday, New Scientist note.

Source: https://www.thesun.co.uk

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This article was published on Wednesday 09 January, 2019.

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